Primrose Plant Care In 3 Simple Steps Looking for tips on how to care for your primrose plants indoors? It's easy if you follow these three simple steps.

primrose care indoors

Easy Indoor Primrose Plant Care In 3 Steps

Wow! Sometimes simplicity rules the day. I really like this video about primrose plant care from the folks at Almondsbury Garden Centre because we get a lot of questions about the care of primrose plants.

The primrose plants most often sold by florists are the polyanthus primula, which is a hybrid variety. They are a common plant found at many floral outlets in the fall, winter, and early spring.

It is a low-growing and compact plant that features small, vibrant clusters of flowers that grow from the center of the plant.

Primrose plant care is really pretty easy as you’ll see in this short video clip. Watch it – I think you’ll agree.


houseplant secrets

Didn’t I tell you it was pretty simple? Just to recap…

Primrose plant care is very easy if you follow these simple tips.

  • Primroses like cooler conditions and can remain in bloom for weeks if kept at temperatures between 50° to 60° F.
  • Primroses need little direct sunlight, making them a great winter-blooming plant to enjoy in this area.
  • Water your primrose frequently, but do not allow it to sit in water, as it can cause the plant to rot.

My Primroses Are Done Flowering. What Do I Do Now?

Just like a few of today’s elite college basketball players, primulas are a blooming plant that’s also considered “one and done”.

After primulas are through blooming, they can be discarded. If you hate the thought of just throwing them away, you can try replanting them outdoors.

If you have an area that’s suitable for growing them, it’s definitely an option.

You can find more information on replating them outdoors here: Primula For All Climates

More Tips and Advice on Indoor Primrose Care

If you would like a little more in-depth care information about caring for primroses indoors, here a couple of resources worth checking out:

Primrose care | HortChat.com®

Care indoors. Keep the plant in bright, indirect sun. Direct sun can scorch the leaves causing dried browned spots. This blooming houseplant will last longer in cooler temperatures (60F). The soil should be well-drained and… Read more …

Primrose Flowers – Growing Primrose Plant Indoors – Picture, Care…

Showy primrose flowers are available from florists mid-winter and produce bright blooms for several weeks. Primrose plant profile, picture, and care tips. Read more …

How to Care for a Potted Primrose Inside During the Winter

Primroses are small, colorful woodland perennials that last for many years with the right planting and care. These plants bloom in a range of colors and grow best… Read more …

Want more care tips like these?

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Until next time,

primrose plant care
primrose plant care
Greg Johnson

I'm the owner of Greenfield Flower Shop in Milwaukee, with more than 40 years of experience in the floral, wedding, and event business.

4 comments

  1. Not poisonous, but can be hazardous. Some German primrose cultivars produce primin, which is an allergen that can cause skin irritation or a rash.

  2. i live in colorado and mine are not doing well indoors. the leaves have yellow spots and blooms die before opening. Im not sure what to do!

  3. Leaf spotting on primulas is usually caused by several fungi. Easiest thing to do is remove the infected leaves when spotting occurs. Fungus is often present in damp conditions. Sounds to me like you should reduce watering a bit.

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